The Colour Thief by Gabriel Alborozo

 

Imagine a world with no colour. No green grass, no blue skies, no colour at all! Well, Zot lived on a greyscale planet, and let me tell you, it was a sad place.

So who is Zot anyway? He is the main alien in Gabriel Alborozo’s The Colour Thief. Unlike his friends and brethren, Zot is a go-getter. Instead of wallowing in his monochromatic home, he sets off on an adventure to the shining blue and green planet that gleams across the galaxy. Any guesses on which planet is what? If you were paying close attention to the title of the story, you know what happens next.

Zot stole all the colours! He called out in his strange language ‘and all the red soared through the air and into his open bag.’ Sparkling with happiness, Zot raced across the planet collecting every single colour, until, he saw a boy with an orange balloon. Well, of course, he stole the orange too. But I won’t tell you what happened after that- you’ll just have to read the book.

Alborozo writes and illustrates his own books. In The Colour Thief, his illustrations are vibrant, when colourful and melancholic when bleached. Having worked as a cartoonist for many years, his characters leap off the page.

We often make use of The Colour Thief in sessions with children, to help them engage with the colours around them. As the story unfurls, and Zot progresses from wan to joy, they explore emotions if they were in a black-and-white world themselves. How would you feel if you were holding a bright orange balloon and suddenly, it’s grey?

 

Tell us what your favourite colour is. Can you imagine a world without it?

Likla
Writer at Art1st

Advertisements

‘Red- A Crayon’s Story’ by Michael Hall

 

Fresh off the Art1st Library Shelves, self-acceptance has never looked more colourful!

In Michael Hall’s ‘Red’, our beloved narrator takes the form of a classic Yellow Pencil as he takes us on ‘Red’ the crayon’s journey of self-discovery.

The story throws out the age-old art teacher’s motto of ‘practice make perfect’ and replaces it with the more current educational focus of exploration.

The narrative spills out of the words into the simple but clever visuals and is enhanced through the little details, like how the older and more experienced crayons are smaller than the newer ones like Red and Berry.

What do you do, if you’re trying to be Red, but you’re always Blue?
Why, you draw Blue Strawberries of course!

‘He was red. But he wasn’t very good at it.’

Likla
Writer at Art1st

A Journey through Visual History of Indian Modern Art: Day 3 for Mumbai Progressive Artist, Ram Kumar

Day 3 was held at Gallery 7 where all the children went to see the exhibition of Ram Kumar, a Bombay Progressives artist.

DSC_0322

The show started with Mr. Prayag Shukla, art critic & poet, introducing the artist and his life. He also led the discussion about the interpretations of art and its meaning(s).“Apni masti mein chalta hai artist, it doesn’t matter whether we paint or not, but we become an artist when we see a work of art. We become an artist because we start adding and subtracting from the work; we see what is there but we also see what is not there.” The kids learnt that every piece of art always has more than one meaning and should always be open to interpretation.

DSC_0398 Everyone being introduced to Mr. Prayag Shukla

DSC_0349Art can never have only one meaning”

DSC_0341  Mr. Prayag Shukla reciting “Dhamak Dhamak”, his poem for children.

The children then went on to create spontaneous works where they explored the beauty of lines and color, inspired by the creations of Ram Kumar.

 DSC_0406

DSC_0417

DSC_0427

This piece is written by Rehaan Kaul, a student intern for Art1st.

A Journey through Visual History of Indian Modern Art: Day 1 @ Delhi Art Gallery

This ART1ST workshop revolved around making the children and young adults aware about Indian Art and its various styles and schools.

The workshop began with the children being asked an important question: Who is an artist?

DSC_0006 DSC_0029

              “An Artist is an explorer”                                “An Artist is a dreamer”

DSC_0044

” An Artist is a creator”

This was followed by the ‘Eye Spy’ game where each participant was given an eye which belonged to a painting among the various present at the gallery. Their job was to navigate through the labyrinth of paintings and find the one which matched the eye they were provided. On finding the right painting, they wrote the name of the artist, the year of conception, name of painting and the school of art it belonged to.

DSC_1018 DSC_1033 DSC_1043 DSC_1199

The children then reconvened back at the meeting point and shared their discoveries and hence the different types of schools were introduced. From all the eyes, a timeline was created that showed the span of different art forms through the years in the country.

DSC_1095 DSC_1115 DSC09754

After this the children chose a few favorite artworks and sketched in their notebooks any element from them.

  DSC_1182 DSC_1204 DSC_1290 DSC_1292DSC_0016DSC_0008

The day ended with everyone sharing the objects/elements they had picked from the paintings they had liked. It was interesting to hear their reasons for picking it- “It had a cricket ball”, “”I loved the lamps”, “I liked the wings”

Wings…that’s what they gave to their ideas, their thoughts.

Rehaan Kaul (Correspondent for Art1st)